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Care you can trust.

The top specialists. The finest facilities. The number to call: 214-645-8300.

If you’re fighting cancer, heart disease, a neurological disorder, or any serious illness, call 214-645-8300 or make an appointment online at utswmedicine.org.

At UT Southwestern, highly specialized physicians treat the most serious and challenging conditions, perform the most complex procedures, and conduct the most advanced and latest clinical trials.

One of the top academic medical centers in the world, UT Southwestern is nationally or highly ranked by U.S. News & World Report. Its Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center is the only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in North Texas.

UTSW’s state-of-the-art William P. Clements Jr. University Hospital places the patient at the center of a true healing environment. Its innovative technology and highly skilled, compassionate caregivers are redefining the future of medicine, today.

UT Southwestern is also a long-standing participant in the Dallas Mexican Consulate’s annual Binational Health Fair, providing free health screenings and information at the event.

 

 

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  • UT Southwestern biochemist Zhijian “James” Chen, Ph.D., is the 2019 recipient of the prestigious Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences for his discovery of the cGAS enzyme that launches the body’s immune defense against infections and cancer. Dr. Chen is the second faculty member to receive Silicon Valley’s Breakthrough Prize since its inception in 2013. Congratulations, Dr. Chen! Learn more: http://bit.ly/2Et0MDj

  • The Dallas Morning News recently spoke with UT Southwestern postdoctoral research fellow Arielle Woznica, Ph.D., about how she is collecting microscopic organisms from area waters to study how they fight off attacks from virus and bacteria. She hopes her research will help better understand how the human immune systems have evolved. Read more about the study: https://bit.ly/2zRlkAM

  • As many as 1 in 200 pregnancies end in stillbirth, a pregnancy tragedy that has a lasting effect on women, their families, and their doctors. In this week’s Your Pregnancy Matters blog, Elaine Duryea, M.D., discusses what we do and do not know about stillbirth and how to reduce the risk.

  • Today, the National Academy of Medicine announced the election of 85 new members, including our own Sean Morrison, Ph.D., Director of the Children's Research Institute at UT Southwestern. Watch this short video about his pioneering research on stem cells and cancer. Congrats, Dr. Morrison!

  • As Parkinson's progresses, the brain has less and less dopamine. Researchers at UT Southwestern were able to modify existing neurons into dopamine-producing neurons. Find out how this discovery may someday lead to therapeutic strategies for treating neurological diseases. http://bit.ly/2ya1iQU

  • Help us congratulate Sean Morrison, Ph.D., Director of the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute (CRI) at UT Southwestern, for his election to the National Academy of Medicine. Dr. Morrison, also an Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researcher, identified a series of genes required for stem cell self-renewal. Self-renewal is necessary for stem cells to persist throughout life and regenerate tissues after injury. Learn more about Dr. Morrison's research efforts: http://bit.ly/2OnyH4N

  • Healthy is probably not the first word that comes to mind when thinking about the Texas State Fair. Our experts are here to help you plan a visit while still watching your waistline, staying cool, and protecting your skin. https://bit.ly/2P6DcNh

  • UT Southwestern scientists are testing a stem cell treatment that could reverse paralysis in patients with rare disorders. Learn more about how this therapy may help establish new treatments for an array of brain and spinal cord conditions. http://bit.ly/2Pj9eWI

  • My husband and I are trying to get an appointment in the hematology center but are getting the runaround. Is there anyone we can speak to to speed up the process?

  • The State Fair has been a Texas tradition since 1886. While it’s known for its outrageous fried food, we want to remind you that you can still enjoy the fair while protecting your waistline. Our experts shared some tips on staying healthy and protecting yourself from the sun when visiting the fairgrounds. https://bit.ly/2P6DcNh

  • When Susan Watkins was first diagnosed with an extremely rare disease, she struggled to find a physician who could provide care. But then she found UTSW’s Dr. Larry Anderson, who quickly developed a comprehensive plan that she now credits with saving her life. “There’s nobody else in Texas that could have done for me what UT Southwestern did,” she says. Read more about her incredible story.

  • Up to 90 percent of lung transplant patients experience an acute rejection during the first year after surgery. UT Southwestern is one of four medical institutions across the country that have annual survival rates that are better than the national average. Discover why UTSW’s Fernando Torres, M.D., says the complications are almost always treatable.

  • Traditional glaucoma surgery carried the risk of temporary or severe vision loss and required several follow-up appointments with a doctor. Today's technology allows for advanced medications and minimally invasive surgeries that offer quicker recoveries and better results. Learn more.

  • Resilience is that ineffable quality that allows some people to be knocked down by life and come back stronger than ever. Learn how to become more resilient by watching our live chat with Jennifer Hughes, Ph.D., M.P.H.

  • Help us congratulate UT Southwestern Medical School's Class of 2022 on receiving their white coats this past weekend! With family and friends, students celebrated the symbolic passage from pre-clinical studies to becoming proficient physicians. UT Southwestern’s first White Coat Ceremony was held in 1997. #whitecoatceremony

  • Many moms-to-be deal with heartburn and other GI issues during pregnancy. In this week’s Your Pregnancy Matters blog, Robyn Horsager-Boehrer, M.D., offers tips to treat four common GI symptoms at home and advises when pregnant women should see a doctor.

  • Scientists at UT Southwestern are hacking into our body’s cellular communication network. Find out how this new approach will help researchers who study diabetes, obesity, and metabolism to develop new ideas and re-examine old ones. http://bit.ly/2OaoloE

  • By injecting patients with stem cells engineered to repair the central nervous system – called progenitor cells – UT Southwestern scientists are working to establish the first treatment that can repair spinal cords inflamed by transverse myelitis. Read story: http://bit.ly/2Pj9eWI

  • Many believe exercise is a great way to blow off steam, but a recent study suggests that vigorous activity could be dangerous for some. UT Southwestern cardiologist Anand Rohatgi, M.D., tells KERA safe and effective ways to manage anger and protect your heart. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2NEaab9

  • We are excited to share that William P. Clements Jr. University Hospital has received a national Rising Star Award for improved quality and safety efforts, ranking it within the country’s top 25 academic medical center hospitals. Learn more about how this recognition reflects our ongoing efforts and commitment to quality care and patient safety. http://bit.ly/2OMT3Ur

  • Some smokers have an emotional connection to cigarettes – it’s the habit they rely on to calm their nerves when they are stressed or upset. Learn how to control craving and stress with our free Smoking Cessation program. Sign up today for more information and live a tobacco-free life. http://bit.ly/UTSWSmokingCessation

  • Help the UT Southwestern Center for Breast Care raise awareness about breast cancer by voting. Voting in the 2018 Support Me! Bra Decorating Contest, that is. "Like" the picture of your favorite bra to cast a vote. Details: http://bit.ly/2y68TiI

  • Advances are made in cancer research every day, but there are still several things patients can do to help themselves in the fight against cancer. From walking more to eating a balanced diet, research shows seemingly small efforts and activities can make a big difference. Here are five of them that can help beat cancer.

  • It's always horrible to get the flu, but even more so when you're expecting. Find out how to protect yourself and your baby from the flu by watching our live chat with high-risk pregnancy specialist Robert Stewart, M.D.

  • Learn what a mommy makeover procedure entails and find answers to your questions in our latest blog: http://bit.ly/2O9sDNm